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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

4 edition of The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala found in the catalog.

The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala

Gordon Randolph Willey

The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala

by Gordon Randolph Willey

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  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Peabody Museum in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Altar de Sacrificios site, Guatemala.
    • Subjects:
    • Altar de Sacrificios site, Guatemala.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 48-49.

      Statementan introduction, by Gordon R. Willey and A. Ledyard Smith.
      SeriesPapers of the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, v. 62, no. 1, Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University ;, v. 62, no. 1.
      ContributionsSmith, A. Ledyard 1901- joint author.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE51 .H337 vol. 62, no. 1, F1435 .H337 vol. 62, no. 1
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 49 p.
      Number of Pages49
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5072646M
      LC Control Number74082521

        Government guards in the s were, when I researched the Pasión in and , under the control of a corrupt official, Gilberto Segura de la Cruz, a comisionado militar for Ríos Montt’s army and the son of Ledyard Smith’s foreman at Altar de Sacrificios and later at Ceibal. Indeed, it was Smith who gave Segura de la Cruz his start. The Sixth The Five Series Book One Contractor Legal Forms Zoom 1 Guide P Dagogique Collectif A Case Of Locomotor Ataxy Without Disease Of The Posterior Columns Of The Spinal Cord The Ruins Of Altar De Sacrificios Department Of Peten Guatemala An Introduction.

      Q'umarkaj, (K'iche': [qʔumarˈkah]) (sometimes rendered as Gumarkaaj, Gumarcaj, Cumarcaj or Kumarcaaj) is an archaeological site in the southwest of the El Quiché department of Guatemala. [2] Q'umarkaj is also known as Utatlán, the Nahuatl translation of the city's name. The name comes from K'iche' Q'umarkah "Place of old reeds". [2] Q'umarkaj was one of the most powerful Maya cities when. Itzan is a Maya archaeological site located in the municipality of La Libertad in the Petén Department of Guatemala. Various small structures at the site were destroyed in the s during oil exploration activities by Sonpetrol and Basic Resources Ltd, prompting rescue excavations by archaeologists. In spite of its small size, the site appears to have been the most politically important.

      Maya History reconstructs the Classic Maya period (roughly A.D. ) from the glyphic record on stelae at numerous sites, including Altar de Sacrificios, Copan, Dos Pilas, Naranjo, Piedras Negras, Quirigua, Tikal, and Yaxchilan. Proskouriakoff traces the spread of governmental institutions from the central Peten, especially from Tikal, to 5/5(2). Q'umarkaj is an archaeological site in the southwest of the El Quiché department of Guatemala. Q'umarkaj is also known as Utatlán, the Nahuatl translation of the city's name. The name comes from K'iche' Q'umarkah "Place of old reeds". Q'umarkaj was one of the most powerful Maya cities when the Spanish arrived in the region in the early 16th.


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The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala by Gordon Randolph Willey Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala; (Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, v.

62, no. 1) [Gordon Randolph Willey] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Willey, Gordon R. (Gordon Randolph), Guatemala book of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala.

Altar de Sacrificios is a ceremonial center and archaeological site of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, situated near the confluence of the Pasión and Salinas Rivers, in the present-day department of Petén, Guatemala. Along with Seibal and Dos Pilas, Altar de Sacrificios is one of the better-known and most intensively-excavated sites in the region, although the site itself does not.

The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala has 0 available edition to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace HPB Marketplace HPB Marketplace million new, used, and rare books, music, and movies. Altar de Sacrificios is a ceremonial center and archaeological The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, situated near the confluence of the Pasión and Salinas Rivers (where they combine to form the Usumacinta River), in the present-day department of Petén, Guatemala.

Altar de Sacrificios is a ceremonial center and archaeological site of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, situated near the confluence of the Pasión and Salinas Rivers, in the present-day department of Petén, Guatemala. The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala / an introduction, by Gordon R.

Willey and A. Ledyard Smith Gordon Randolph Willey [ Book: ]. La Corona is an ancient Maya city in Guatemala's Petén department that was discovered in and later revealed to be the long-sought "Site Q", a prominent, undiscovered Maya city. "La Corona" means "the crown" in Spanish; the first archaeologists to study the site named it this after seeing a row of five temples that resembled a crown.

La Blanca is a Maya archaeological site in the municipality of Melchor de Mencos in the northern Petén Department of site is located in the lower reaches of the Mopan River valley and features a large acropolis complex. The Tikal ruins are undoubtedly the most famous Mayan archaeological site, not just in Guatemala, but possibly the entire Maya Empire.

Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site inTikal was once among the most powerful ancient Mayan kingdoms.

Today, the Tikal ruins easily accessible for travelers, are located near abundant accommodations in the colonial town of : Kirsten Hubbard. Aguateca is a Maya site located in northern Guatemala's Petexbatun Basin, in the department of first settlements at Aguateca date to the Late Preclassic period ( BC - AD ).

The center was occupied from about B.C. until about A.D., when the city was attacked and ransacked. World Pilgrimage Guide by National Geographic photographer Martin Gray. Information, pictures, maps of holy places and sacred sites in countries. Myth. The Inscription on the Altar of Zoomorph O, Quirigua () / J.

Eric S. Thompson Archaeological Discovery at Finca Arizona, Guatemala () / Edwin M. Shook Contents note continued: The Initial and Supplementary Series of Stela 5 at Altar de Sacrificios, Guatemala () / Sylvanus G. Morley. The Inscription on the Altar of Zoomorph O, Quirigua ()—/.

Eric S. Thompson Archaeological Discovery at Finca Arizona, Guatemala ()—Edwin M. Shook The Initial and Supplementary Series of Stela 5 at Altar de Sacrificios, Guatemala ()— Sylvanus G. Morley Mausolea in Central Veracruz ()—Jose. The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala.

By Gordon Randolph Willey, A. Ledyard Smith. see all from $. Pulltrouser Swamp: Ancient Maya habitat, agriculture, and settlement in Northern Belize. By B. Turner, Peter D. Harrison. see. Guatemala is an archaeology dork’s paradise. It’s filled with literally hundreds of Mayan ruins, particularly up north, where the Mayan civilization carved out the wilderness to build massive cities in stone.

You could spend your whole life here, digging up Mayan treasures, and maybe even finding a whole new lost city.

Alta de Los Sacrificios UEOLOGIC a Félix lote n FC Cooperativa agrícola Pipiles Pista e 24 23 e DE FIERRO 1 ALTAR DE LOS SACRIFICIOS Il LAS CRUCES 1 GUATEMALA DOS PILAS Ill Guatemala, Cartográfica Interamencano.

de Defensa, Washington, D 66 08 20' ' 64 65 08 Tikal report no. map[s] of the ruins of Tikal, El Peten, Guatemala [Robert F., & James E. Hazard Carr] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Ruins of Altar de Sacrificios, Department of Peten, Guatemala: An Introduction by Gordon R.

Willey, A. Ledyard Smith. The Ruins of Altar de Sacrificios, Department of Peten, Guatemala: An Introduction by Gordon R. Willey, A. Ledyard Smith (pp. ) A Book of Readings by Norman Birnbaum, Gertrud Lenzer. With A.

Smith. The Ruins of Altar de Sacrificios, Department of Peten, Guatemala: An Introduction. Papers Peabody Museum Harvard University 62(1). An Introduction to American Archaeology, vol. 2, South America. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

The Viru Valley settlement pattern study. The ruins of Altar de Sacrificios, Department of Peten, Guatemala an introduction, by Gordon R. Willey and A. Ledyard Smith. Cambridge, Mass., Peabody Museum, EN42 v Frances Densmore and American Indian music a memorial volume.

Compiled and edited by Charles Hofmann. New York, Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, The ruins of Altar de Sacrifícios, Department of Petén, Guatemala by Gordon Randolph Willey 1 edition - first published in Download DAISY.The Carnegie Maya IV is the fourth in a series of volumes that make available the primary data and interpretive studies originally produced by archaeologists and anthropologists in the Maya region under the umbrella of the Carnegie Institute of Washington’s Division of Historical : John M.

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