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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of mission of the church in Paul"s letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism found in the catalog.

mission of the church in Paul"s letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism

J. Patrick Ware

mission of the church in Paul"s letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism

by J. Patrick Ware

  • 190 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bible. -- N.T. -- Philippians -- Criticism, interpretation, etc,
  • Bible -- Criticism, interpretation, etc,
  • Missions -- Biblical teaching,
  • Mission of the church -- Biblical teaching,
  • Judaism -- Relations -- Christianity,
  • Christianity and other religions -- Judaism

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-335) and indexes.

    Statementby James P. Ware.
    SeriesSupplements to Novum Testamentum -- v. 120
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBV2073 .W28 2005
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 380 p. ;
    Number of Pages380
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18910715M
    ISBN 109004146415
    LC Control Number2005047223

    Paul and Philippi Philippians Paul, the Author of Philippians Paul wrote the Philippian letter from Rome during his first imprisonment. Timothy was with him at the time, so he was mentioned by Paul. The apostle probably used Timothy's name here because he was with him when the church at Philippi was started. He described both of them as. The Letter of Paul to the Philippians - Φιλιππησίους - is one of his 4 Captivity Letters, along with Ephesians (which precedes it), Colossians (which follows it), and Philemon in the New Testament of the Bible. St. Paul established the first Christian community at Philippi in Europe on his Second Missionary Journey (Acts - ).). While he was in Asia Minor, he had planned.

      Partway through his letter to the Philippian Christians Paul expresses his deep thankfulness for Epaphroditus, a member of their house church (). In particular Paul urges these believers “to hold Epaphroditus in honour” because he was willing “to expose his life to danger to the point of death” as he fulfilled his mission to.   Paul began by expressing his thanks to the Philippians.” My New King James Bible says it this way: “Paul wrote Philippians as a thank-you note to the believers of Philippi, for their help in his hour of need.” What I realized is that essentially the whole book of Philippians is an example of a canonized thank-you note to supporters!!

    Paul’s Letter to the Philippians—How to Understand It 1 Introduction Paul wrote his letter to the Philippians while he was in prison (Philippians ). Most scholars conclude that his imprisonment was in Rome, where he stayed for two years (Acts ), and that the letter was written shortly before his release. In support of this conclusion. Paul also concerned over the Philippians persecution (), over their being exposed to false teachings (), and internal conflicts which would threaten their witnessing to those outside of the church (, , 3). Paul’s prayer for the Philippians was about their love shown in the gift of financial support to him. He assured.


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Mission of the church in Paul"s letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism by J. Patrick Ware Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a reissue of Brill's publication "The mission of the church in Paul's letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism" (Supplements to Novum Testamentum v. 4/5(1). The Jewish context of Paul’s thought in Philippians is the key to unlocking his understanding of church and mission in the letter.

The study accordingly begins in Part One with an investigation of conversion of gentiles in ancient Judaism. Part Two, drawing upon this Jewish context, focuses on close exegesis of Philippians, revealing the Cited by: The Jewish context of Paul's thought in Philippians is the key to unlocking his understanding of church and mission in the letter.

The study accordingly begins in Part One with an investigation of conversion of gentiles in ancient Judaism. Part Two, drawing upon this Jewish context, focuses on close exegesis of Philippians, revealing the 2/5(1). This essential study examines Paul’s letter to the Philippians in its ancient Jewish context.

It makes a convincing case that Paul expected churches to continue the work of spreading the gospel. The Logos Bible Software edition of this volume is designed to encourage and stimulate your study and understanding of Scripture.

The Letter of Paul to the Philippians. In its present canonical form Philippians is, according to several scholars, a later collection of fragments of the correspondence of Paul with the congregation in Philippi that was founded by Paul himself. The first of the two major difficulties leading to this conclusion concerning redaction of the letter is created by a discrepancy between chapters 2.

Paul writes the letter to confirm that what the Philippians heard was true—Epaphroditus was sick—but also to assure them that their friend had recovered and would return to them soon.

Paul wanted to maintain his relationship with the Philippians. Paul met the Philippians on his second missionary journey, which we read about in Acts   Letter of Paul to the Philippians, also called Epistle of St.

Paul the Apostle to the Philippians, abbreviation Philippians, eleventh book of the New Testament, written by St. Paul the Apostle to the Christian congregation he had established in Philippi. It was penned while he was in prison, probably at Rome or Ephesus, about 62 ce. The Mission of the Church In Paul s Letter to the Philippians in the Context of Ancient Judaism Book Summary: Illumining the Jewish context of early Christian mission, this study through close exegesis of Paul's letter to the Philippians reveals the crucial place of the mission of the church in Paul's.

Philippians Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own.

But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. And when I was in Thessalonica, you sent to supply my need both once and twice (Philippians - 11, 14 - 16, HBFV, see also 2Corinthians ).

Paul's letter to believers living in Philippi, which is found in the New Testament, was written between 61 and 63 A.D. Paul's Mission and Letters to what we see in all the standard letters of the ancient world.

Letter writing itself had a very standardized style and tone, and we know from the discovery of many. A letter written by Paul to the church in the city of Philippi, the first Christian church in the province of Macedonia; the eleventh book in the NT canon.

Paul and the Philippian church The church in Philippi was founded by Paul and his party on his so-called second missionary journey as related in the eyewitness account (a “we-section.

The mission of the church in Paul's letter to the Philippians in the context of ancient Judaism. [James P Ware] The author has an impressive grasp of the secondary literature; the book Read more User-contributed reviews.

Tags. Add tags for "The. Get this from a library. Paul and the mission of the church: Philippians in ancient Jewish context.

[James P Ware] -- This essential study examines Paul's letter to the Philippians in its ancient Jewish context, making a convincing case that Paul expected churches to. Paul begins his letter with words thanking God for the Philippians’ “partnership in the gospel from the first day until now” (–5).

Such expressions of gratitude were common in first-century letters, and, indeed, Paul regularly began his epistles in this manner (for example, 1. What Roman legal practice provides a reasonable context for understanding Paul's letter to Philemon.

The phrases "imperial guard" and "the emperor's household" in Paul's letter to the Philippians prove that he wrote the letter from Rome. False.

The church in Philippi gave generously to help Paul in his mission work. true. The church at Philippi appears to be Paul’s favorite, and the Letter to the Philippians is thus the most personal of any that he wrote to a church.

1 Timothy (A.D. ) Topic: The organization and administration of churches by Timothy. The letter proceeds from a greeting to a warning against false teachers who mishandle the law.

Author: Paul Date Written: AD 61 Chapters: 4 Key People: Paul, Timothy, Epaphroditus, Church at Philippi Summary: The letter to the Philippians was written to encourage the church at thanked them for their generosity toward him in a time of need. He encouraged them to rejoice in the Lord always—and to rejoice only in the Lord.

letter that can better be understood within the context of Philippi’s history: 1. Paul wrote to the Philippians from his Roman prison concerning the progress of the gospel among “the praetorian guard” (). This would have had special meaning to the veterans and citizens in Philippi.

Paul does not mention this guard in any other place. This volume discusses the development of disunity in the Philippian church as the occasion for Paul's response in his first part of the book examines references and allusions to strife among the Philippians and tension between them and Paul.

It demonstrates the pervasiveness of the theme of disunity in most sections of the letter.1/5(1). Why did Paul write to the Philippians? In examining Paul’s reasons for writing to the Philippians it is important to place the letter within the context of when it was written and whom it was written.

Philippi was an ancient and major city in Macedonia, Greece. It was taken over by Philip of Macedonia, the father of Alexander the Great.Philippians 2 Paul further encourages Church members to be united and points to the example of Jesus Christ, who condescended to come into mortality, as an example of love, obedience, and humility.

Everyone will one day acknowledge Jesus Christ as Lord. Paul instructs Church members to work out their own salvation.The early church was unanimous in its testimony that Philippians was written by the apostle Paul (see). Internally the letter reveals the stamp of genuineness. The many personal references of the author fit what we know of Paul from other NT books.

It is evident that Paul wrote the letter from prison (see –14). Some have argued that.