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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks. found in the catalog.

Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks.

David M. McClung

Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks.

by David M. McClung

  • 357 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by National Hydrology Research Institute in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesNHRI papers -- 6
ContributionsNational Hydrology Research Institute (Canada)
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15100786M
ISBN 10066211017X

Twinning and dislocation glide are intra‐crystalline processes not sensitive to pressure, whereas mode I cracking is pressure‐sensitive. Twinning is particularly important when only a limited number of slip systems are activated in a crystal, as it can palliate the need of five independent glide systems required for plastic deformation to. Creep is indicated by curved tree trunks, bent fences or retaining walls, tilted poles or fences, and small soil ripples or ridges; Curves in tree trunks indicate creep because the base of the tree is moving downslope while the top is trying to grow straight up (figure 8). Tilted telephone or power company poles are also signs of creep.

Evaporation losses from mountain snowpacks amounted to approximately 60% of the snow season precipitation in an alpine setting and to approximately 45~ in both a forest and a forest opening. Forest clearings similar to a better understanding of these processes will lead to better definition. Each of these types occupies large portions of the Rocky Mountain landscape and each is described below. (1) Riparian wetlands occur along moving water courses such as rivers and creeks. These wetlands receive a large seasonal pulse of water from the melt- ing of mountain snowpacks.

areas of the mountain West are most sensitive to fur-ther warming. DATA AND MODEL. Snow course data. Spring snowpack is an important predictor of summer streamflow, and toward this end, snowpack measure-ments began at a few carefully chosen sites (snow courses) early in the twentieth century. Widespread by the late s, these manual. Although landslides are primarily associated with mountainous regions, they can also occur in areas of generally low relief. In low-relief areas, landslides occur as cut-and-fill failures (roadway and building excavations), river bluff failures, lateral spreading landslides, collapse of mine-waste piles (especially coal), and a wide variety of slope failures associated with quarries and open.


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Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks by David M. McClung Download PDF EPUB FB2

Creep and Glide Processes in Mountain Snowpacks (Canada National Hydrology Research Institute, Paper 6) [David M. McClung] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Creep and Glide Processes in Mountain Snowpacks (Canada National Hydrology Research Institute, Paper 6)Author: David M.

McClung. Get this from a library. Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks. [David McClung; National Hydrology Research Institute (Canada)]. Snow forces are a result of glide and creep processes in the snowpack. Snow gliding is a downhill motion of snow on the ground mainly influenced by the roughness of the ground surface – the smoother the ground surface the higher the glide rates – and the wetness of the lowermost boundary layer of the snow cover (In der Gand and Zupancic, ); snow gliding mainly occurs in March and Cited by:   This is of practical importance in order to - analyse the stabilising effect of mountain forests and technical supporting structures, - analyse the influence of the ground roughness and the conditions in the snow-ground interface layer, and Correspondence to: S.

Wieshofer Phys. Chem. Earth (B), Vol. 2,5, No. 9, pp.Elsevier Cited by: 2. The process repeats itself when the next local stress maximum is obtained. So repetitive local stress maxima and minima could be detected during solute drag creep.

Dislocation climb-glide creep. Dislocation climb-glide creep is observed in materials at high temperature. The initial creep rate is larger than the steady-state creep rate. of Snow Settlement, Research Notes of the National Research Center for Disaster Prevention Creep and Snow-Earth Interface Condition, Pro-ceedings of Grindelwald Sympceium 19 Jan   Mountain snowpack and spring runoff are key components of surface water resources, and serve as important, regionally integrated indicators of climate variability and change.

This study examines whether mountain snowpack and snowmelt have manifested a consistent hydrologic response to global climatic changes over the past several decades. Creep and glide processes in mountain snowpacks. National Hydrology Research Institute, Paper No. 6, 11lla1ld Waters Directorate, Ottawa, Canada, 66 p.

Glacier sliding down an inclined wavy bed. Snow gliding is a downhill motion of snow on the ground; it is able to affect afforestation (uprooting of plants) and to cause soil erosion. Once the glide motion turns into an avalanche movement, the process is called a glide avalanche.

Winters with continuing snow gliding and a high activity of glide avalanches might be called ‘glide winters’. The most recent ‘glide winter’ in the. 2 Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry Network: History, Methods, and the Importance of Monitoring Mountain Ecosystems Wyoming, and New Mexico, where snowpacks persist with negligible melt through the snowfall season.

Thus, a program designed to more thoroughly deter-mine the quality of precipitation and identify sources. However, in recent years, numerous accidents caused by gliding snowpacks and glide avalanches have been observed.

For instance, although the – and – winters experienced very different snowpack formation conditions, both were associated with glide avalanche activity [Mitterer and Schweizer, ; Pielmeier et al., ].

Snowpack forms from layers of snow that accumulate in geographic regions and high altitudes where the climate includes cold weather for extended periods during the year. Snowpacks are an important water resource that feed streams and rivers as they ore, snowpacks are both the drinking water source for many communities and a potential source of flooding (in case of sudden melting).

Processes not considered in these VIC model simulations are changes in land cover or land use (e.g., forest harvesting or deforestation by the recent mountain pine beetle outbreak in. Field data from snow avalanche fracture lines for slope angle and slab depth (measured perpendicular to the weak layer) were analyzed for different triggering mechanisms.

For slope angle, the results showed that the same probability density function (pdf) (of log-logistic type) and range (25°–55°) apply independent of triggering mechanism. For slab depth, the same pdf (generalized extreme. On unsheltered snowpacks, high winds can evaporate the snow cover at temperatures lower than 32° F -- a process called sublimation.

Mountain snowpacks do not melt steadily. Melting varies according to weather, ground temperature, and exposure to the sun's rays. A snowpack begins to melt when its temperature from top to bottom equalizes at Abstract.

Snow gliding and glide-snow avalanches are gaining importance among scientists as global warming might induce conditions favourable to those phenomena. Our aim is to analyse such processes with a particular focus on the potential driving factors associated with the soil conditions.

We equipped two experimental test sites in the Aosta Valley region (NW Italy) with glide-snow shoes. Water plays a key role in shaping our planet and making life possible. Given the abundance of water on Earth's surface and in its interior, chemical reactions involving water, nam.

Creep definition is - to move along with the body prone and close to the ground. How to use creep in a sentence. Rapidly declining mountain snowpacks and earlier melt onsets result in a day advance of the Fraser River’s spring freshet with subsequent reductions in summer flows when up-river salmon migrations occur.

Identification of the sub-basins driving the Fraser River’s most significant changes provides a measure of seasonal predictability of. regions and occur in almost all mountain areas, and snowpacks, wet snow avalanches occur almost exclusively in spring.

The warm snowpacks tend to (Perla ), and creep and glide velocities to increase (Schaerer ) with increasing liquid water content.

The mountain climate gives our area four distinct seasons, with plenty of adventure and action for each. Summer days are filled with sunshine and shimmering water as boats and other water-goers glide through the waters. Winter coats the landscape with a brilliant white blanket, providing amazing skiing conditions for Wisp Resort.Abstract.

Snow gliding is a key factor for snow-glide avalanche formation and soil erosion. This study considers atmospheric and snow variables, vegetation characteristics, and soil properties and determines their relevance for snow gliding at a test site (Wildkogel, Upper Pinzgau, Austria) during winter / The time-dependent data were collected at a high temporal resolution.differential settling, creep, and glide.

These forces are no only tremendous (an above timberline, late season sensor surface), but tend to show up in the snow sensor data stream and are troublesome to interpret. The formation of very strong basal layers in deep snowpacks is a .